Wednesday, June 6, 2012

Life and science challenges: flames, Hawkeye, the needle and the damage done

(source)

Of Heroin, Honorable Mentions, and Hawkeye: A day I will never forget

By Double X Science Biology Editor Jeanne Garbarino


“I look forward to seeing you in 3 months when you will be a whole person again.”

Those were my parting words to a special person in my life who was embarking on an undoubtedly difficult journey toward sobriety.  It was only 7:45am on Friday, June 1st, but already I had learned that the strings from a bikini top make a good tourniquet, and I actually held the syringe that, only moments before, contained a bolus of heroin.  I am still trying to believe that this really was the last time.  

As I attempted to wrap my head around what was happening, I remembered a description of a heroin high as told to me by a former addict.  According to this person, being on heroin feels like you’ve been swaddled in a warm blanket, and gently rocked by a loving mother, except the loving mother was actually the devil.  

Though I could never really understand what it feels like to be hooked on heroin, this helped me make some sense of it.  But, as much as I wanted to be sympathetic, I also wanted to grab my friend by the shoulders and scream.  “Why have you done this to yourself?  Why have you done this to us?”  It has truly been a difficult time, watching this person struggle.  And finding out that I can’t control any of it was probably the hardest lesson I’ve ever learned.

Still, life must go on.

I took a few deep breaths, which helped to quiet the tremble, and began to gather my thoughts.  What was it that I had to do today?  As if I flipped some switch, I began to plan out my day – renew my parking permit, finish that Western blot, read that thesis, and get that new post up on the site.  

Then, around 8:15am, I received an unexpected phone call.  It was Liz Bass from the Center of Communicating Science at Stony Brook University.  She was calling to see if I could make Alan Alda’s World Science Festival discussion about the Flame Challenge, which was to occur at 4pm that afternoon.  Not really knowing what was in store, I quickly accepted (um, hello, Alan Alda).  A second phone call about 20 minutes later informed me that I would be joining Alan on stage.  Was this really happening?  In about 30 minutes time, I went from despair to elation.  I also went to the store to buy a skirt since I was already in transit to my lab (and was dressed like a “scientist”).

As I sat on the train, I began to reflect.  Much of my free time during the month of March was dedicated to producing an entry to Alan Alda’s Flame Challenge contest, which, in an effort to raise science communication awareness, asked scientists from all over the world to define a flame to an 11 year old.  Because I enjoy working on a team, I asked my fellow scicommies, Deborah Berebichez and Perrin Ireland, to join me on this endeavor (three times the brain power!).  For several weeks, we worked on the script, and regularly discussed our progress during late night Google hangouts (which is a fantastic way to collaborate).  This was mostly due to the fact that we all have day jobs and obligations outside of work.  Luckily for me, Debbie and Perrin were willing to meet at a time that coincided after my children’s bedtime routine.

This experience was truly fun and rewarding.  Each of us has a certain set of strengths, which when combined, seemed to just synergize.  We literally examined every word in the script to make sure that it was clear, concise, and hopefully captivating.  Furthermore, we wanted to make sure that it was something an 11-year-old would both learn from and enjoy.

But, we did labor over one particular issue, and that was our use of the Bohr Model to represent an atom.  While this model might be commonplace in many classroom textbooks, scientists now know that electrons exist in orbitals, also known as electron clouds, and the calculations to determine the exact location(s) of an electron are based on probability.  Clearly, this was something very different than stating that electrons simply orbit around a nucleus.  

The analogy that electrons travel around the nucleus in the same way that planets travel around the sun is downright inaccurate.  However, this is an analogy that is still commonly used and is, in my opinion, a great example of how we sacrifice accuracy for simplicity.  I believe that this is the greatest challenge for a science communicator.  

As we talked through this issue, we tried to not lose site of the actual mission, which was to explain a flame to an 11 year old.  Would it help our story to break down the currently accepted atomic theory or would it detract from it?  In the end, we decided to keep our atomic structure simple, but noted that it was a simplified version of an atom.  We figured that by having this little disclaimer, it would inform our audience that there is more to it that what we showed, and maybe it would lead them down a road of scientific inquiry.  

Perhaps it was this attention to detail that landed our Flame Challenge video a spot in the top 15 entries (FYI there were close to 900 entries).   Or perhaps it was because our entry was cute and artistic.  Whatever the reason, we proudly accepted our honorable mention, and I was looking forward to discussing our video with the man himself.

Getting back to Friday, June 1st.   I arrived at the Paley Center for Media around 3:30pm (in a new skirt) and was immediately brought up to the 11th floor and into the green room of Alan Alda.  There, I met my fellow awardees (a combination of finalists and honorable mentions), and of course Alan Alda, who was fantastically charming and funny.  We all sat, around an old table, on which was a lovely array of cheese, nuts, banana chips, and get this, Swedish fish!  I don’t know what it was about the Swedish fish, but seeing this candy helped calm my nerves.

Alan helped us all to break the ice, and discussed his plans for the event.  Apparently we would be leading a panel discussion, and I would be on that panel.  On a stage.  In front of a very large audience.  And it was to be webcasted.  So I popped a few of those Swedish fish and told myself to not be nervous.

As my jaw worked to chew those sticky sweet candies, I couldn’t help but think about when I was a kid and how I used to sit with my dad and watch M*A*S*H.  I never would have believed you if you told me that I was going to be hanging out with Hawkeye when I was older.  But, there he was, telling us about the birth of the Flame Challenge.  I was tempted to ask him where Corporal Klinger is these days, but decided that my time would be better spent getting the plan for the panel firmed up in my brain.

After some quick chitchat, we were asked to make our way to the auditorium.  Seating was charted and mics were checked and around 4pm, it all began.  About an hour into it, we were asked to come on stage.  Each of our entries were highlighted, followed by a chance speak our piece.  Add in some Q&A from the audience and the panel discussion was complete.  A hearty round of applause later, I found myself getting whisked away for pictures.  

When the dust began to settle, I grabbed a beer and started to decompress.  I just couldn’t believe how this day turned out, especially given its start.  The stresses my family and I have been dealing with have certainly taken its toll on all of us, and I am grateful for that little dose of Hawkeye to help lighten things up.  I’m not sure if I will ever experience a day like that again, but that’s ok with me.  

3 comments:

  1. Wow! Congrats on the Flame Challenge and best wishes for your friend.

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  2. What a crazy day! I too watched MASH with my father and can't imagine meeting Alan Alda in person - I don't know if I would have been able to hold back on the Hawkeye comments. Congrats on your awesome science communication acknowledgements and best wishes to your friend on the difficult road to getting sober.

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  3. My wife and I, (both physics grad. students at NMSU), worked at BNL for the last two years and were lucky enough to attend two of the classes, (improv for scientists and distilling your message), setup by Alan Alda and co. at the Center of Communicating Science at Stony Brook. Both classes were excellent1 We lucked out finding each of the classes at the last minute though and barely got enrolled each time. We completely missed the flame challenge.

    Missing available conferences, classes, and events for scientists has become a bit of a litany among the students we know. Are you aware of any communication channel that helps to locate these opportunities?

    Thanks!

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